Ace is the place for canning products

What is "Canning?"
One of the most common methods for preserving foods today is to enclose them in a sterile container. The term "canning" refers to this method although the specific container can be glass, plastic, or some other material as well as a metal can, from which the procedure originally obtained its name. The basic principle behind canning is that a food is sterilized, usually by heating, and then placed within an air-tight container. In the absence of air, no new pathogens can gain access to the sterilized food. In most canning operations, the food to be packaged is first prepared in some way—cleaned, peeled, sliced, chopped, or treated in some other way—and then placed directly into the container. The container is then placed in hot water or some other environment where its temperature is raised above the boiling point of water for some period of time. This heating process achieves two goals at once. First, it kills the vast majority of pathogens that may be present in the container. Second, it forces out most of the air above the food in the container.

After heating has been completed, the top of the container is sealed. In home canning procedures, one way of sealing the (usually glass) container is to place a layer of melted paraffin directly on top of the food. As the paraffin cools, it forms a tight solid seal on top of the food. Instead of or in addition to the paraffin seal, the container is also sealed with a metal screw top containing a rubber gasket. The first glass jar designed for this type of home canning operation, the Mason jar, was patented in 1858.

Ace is the place for canning

Ace is the place for everything you need to lock in fresh flavor.


FRUIT CANNING CHART

Fresh ProduceMeasure and WeightApproximate Number
of Quart Jars Needed
Approximate Pounds
Needed for 1 Quart Jar
Apples 1 BU (48 LB) 16-20 2-1/2 to 3
Apricots 1 LUG (22 LB) 7-11 2 to 2-1/2
Berries 24 Quart Crate 12-18 1-1/2 to 3
Cherries 1 LUG (22 LB) 9-11 2 to 2-1/2 (Unpitted)
Peaches 1 BU (48 LB) 18-24 2 to 3
Pears 1 BU (50 LB) 20-25 2 to 3
Tomatoes 1 BU (53 LB) 15-20 2-1/2 to 3-1/2
Tomatoes (for juice) 1 BU (53 LB) 12-16 3 to 3-1/2

VEGETABLE CANNING CHART

Fresh ProduceMeasure and WeightApproximate Number
of Quart Jars Needed
Approximate Pounds
Needed for 1 Quart Jar
Beans, Green/Wax 1 BU (30 LB) 12-20 1-1/2 to 2-1/2
Beans, Lima (Pods) 1 BU (32 LB) 6-10 3 - 5
Beets, (Trim tops) 1 BU (52 LB) 15-24 3-1/3 to 3-1/2
Carrots, (Trim tops) 1 BU (50 LB) 16-25 2 to 3
Corn, (With Husks) 1 BU (35 LB) 6-10 3-1/2 to 6
Peas (Pods) 1 BU (30 LB) 5-10 3 to 6
Pickles 1 BU (48 LB) 16-24 2 to 3
Squash, Summer 1 BU (40 LB) 10-20 2 to 4

SYRUP CANNING CHART

Syrup TypeSugar to 1 Qt. WaterSyrup Yield
Very Light 1 Cup 4-1/2 Cups
Light 2 Cup 5 Cups
Medium 3 Cup 5-1/2 Cups
Heavy 4-3/4 Cup 6-1/2 Cups

Ace Hardware Helpful Tip:
Canning Supplies

Getting Started with Ball Canning

Learn how to get started canning and preserving foods with expert tips from Ball Canning. See step-by-step how to use the Ball Canning Discovery Kit to preserve fresh produce.

How to Make Fresh Berry Jam

Learn how to create fresh jams, jellies and preserves with expert tips from Ball Canning. See step-by-step how to use the Automatic Jam and Jelly Maker to make delicious spreads.

Canning Tomatoes with Ball Canning

Learn how to can tomatoes with Ball Canning, your ultimate resource for home canning and preserving. This video shows you how to can sun-ripened, garden tomatoes, straight from the vine.

Canning Green Beans with Ball Canning

Learn how to can green beans with Ball, the leader in home canning and fresh preserving. This video shows you how to safely preserve vegetables - like green beans - at home, using Ball regular mouth pint glass canning jars.

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